Wednesday, 18 June 2014

Hacker: Getting Inside My Mind

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(ARC copy given by NetGalley)
Author: Ted Dekker
Publishing House: Worthy Publishing
280 pages
Publication:  10th June 2014
Book 3 of the Outlaw Chronicles
Review by Lady Entropy

 

Nyah Parks is a hacker extraordinaire with an interesting way of building her client base. Obviously, corporations don’t like it when you can hack into their systems. They pay hackers lots of money to try to exploit any flaws in their security. Nyah likes doing things backward. Compromise the system, then offer to show them where the flaws are. Except this time she’s gotten in over her head.

 

Now on the run, and under watch from the FBI, Nyah holes up with Austin, a fellow hacker whose been studying a computer unlike any other—the human brain. Austin opens Nyah up to a world of new possibilities, possibly even another plane of existence. Nyah is able to jump out of her mind like a modern-day prophet and see the future. And what she sees is personally devastating.


I made the serious mistake of reading this book and not reviewing it immediately (because a few days later I left the country) -- as I consequence I can now barely remember my feelings about it other than a big resounding..."Meh".


The book ends up being a lot more philosophical than cyberpunk (which, I admit, was what I was looking for) so maybe that is where most of my disappointment comes from. That and the frequent shifts between 3rd person narrator and 1st person narrator. Personal pet peeve of mine, and something I only allow to Charles Stross to do.

I also remember the dreadful disappointment at the cheap romance (put in, no doubt, so we'd get an emotional kick when bad things happened to the boy, but it never materialized since it was so obvious that it would happen that I just didn't care). For some reason, another scene that stuck with me that was a near "Throw the damn book against a wall" was when the FBI found the corpse of a person who ODed on heroin -- and immediately assumed he was a junky even though a friend swore he never did drugs, the whole thing was a set up from the villains. Here's the thing -- if the boy was a junky, he would have needle tracks on his arm. But since he obviously wouldn't have any (as I said, villain's doing) it should be obvious what had happened. But of course it takes the FBI forever to figure this out.

Finally, there were some cool scenes and concepts, and some heart-wrenching moments but all in all, I wound up finding the book way too forgettable for the potential it could have had.

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